Florida

The Florida Wildlife Corridor Expedition

Last fall, at the Society of Environmental Journalists' annual conference in Miami, I organized and moderated a panel on which environmental photojournalists discussed their work. I became friends with all of the panelists, but recognized one - Carlton Ward, Jr. - as a kindred spirit in adventure when a group of us ended up swimming in the Atlantic in middle of the night. Carlton was organizing a far more ambitious adventure - the Florida Wildlife Corridor Expedition, a 1,000 mile journey by human power from the southern tip of the Everglades to the Okefenokee Swamp. On Sunday, Carlton and his three companions finished their trek and moved on to the next stage of their work - establishing a continuous wildlife corridor running the length of Florida. For yesterday's Weekend Edition, National Public Radio caught up with the team. The piece is worth a listen, and the Florida Wildlife Corridor is a worthy endeavor to provide appropriate habitat for Florida panthers, black bears, and countless other species threatened by Florida's rapid development.Last fall, at the Society of Environmental Journalists' annual conference in Miami, I organized and moderated a panel on which environmental photojournalists discussed their work. I became friends with all of the panelists, but recognized one - Carlton Ward, Jr. - as a kindred spirit in adventure when a group of us ended up swimming in the Atlantic in middle of the night. Carlton was organizing a far more ambitious adventure - the Florida Wildlife Corridor Expedition, a 1,000 mile journey by human power from the southern tip of the Everglades to the Okefenokee Swamp. On Sunday, Carlton and his three companions finished their trek and moved on to the next stage of their work - establishing a continuous wildlife corridor running the length of Florida. For yesterday's Weekend Edition, National Public Radio caught up with the team. The piece is worth a listen, and the Florida Wildlife Corridor is a worthy endeavor to provide appropriate habitat for Florida panthers, black bears, and countless other species threatened by Florida's rapid development.Last fall, at the Society of Environmental Journalists' annual conference in Miami, I organized and moderated a panel on which environmental photojournalists discussed their work. I became friends with all of the panelists, but recognized one - Carlton Ward, Jr. - as a kindred spirit in adventure when a group of us ended up swimming in the Atlantic in middle of the night. Carlton was organizing a far more ambitious adventure - the Florida Wildlife Corridor Expedition, a 1,000 mile journey by human power from the southern tip of the Everglades to the Okefenokee Swamp. On Sunday, Carlton and his three companions finished their trek and moved on to the next stage of their work - establishing a continuous wildlife corridor running the length of Florida. For yesterday's Weekend Edition, National Public Radio caught up with the team. The piece is worth a listen, and the Florida Wildlife Corridor is a worthy endeavor to provide appropriate habitat for Florida panthers, black bears, and countless other species threatened by Florida's rapid development.

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